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  • jkabtech 12:17 pm on August 2, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , interview,   

    How to Download and Watch The Interview 

    You don’t need to leave your house to watch “The Interview.” Sony Pictures released the comedy on digital platforms Wednesday.

    The online release comes a day after the studio reversed its previous decision not to show the movie after hackers stole internal documents and emails from Sony. The U.S. said North Korea was behind the hack. In “The Interview,” Seth Rogen and James Franco play journalists tasked by the CIA with killing North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

    Viewers can rent the movie for $5.99 (roughly Rs. 377) or buy it for $14.99 (roughly Rs. 940). Rentals are good for 48 hours. The movie’s running time is 1 hour, 52 minutes.

    Here’s where you can watch “The Interview” online
    Google Play
    Buy or rent the film from Google Inc.’s platform. The movie can be viewed on the Google Play app for Android and Apple devices, as well as through some streaming devices including Roku and Google’s Nexus Player.

    Link

    YouTube
    The video site, also owned by Google, has “The Interview” available to rent or buy on its movie page. It can be viewed on a website, YouTube’s app and selected streaming devices including Apple TV, PlayStation and Xbox.

    Link

    Xbox
    This option is for those who own Microsoft Corp.’s Xbox video game console, a Windows smartphone, or a computer or tablet that runs Windows 8 software.

    Link

    Sony
    The studio, owned by Sony Corp., set up a separate website where viewers can rent and stream the film online.

    Link

    For the latest tech news and reviews, follow Gadgets 360 on Twitter, Facebook, and subscribe to our YouTube channel.

    Tags: Apple TV, Google, Google Play, Home Entertainment, Internet, Microsoft, Roku, Sony, Sony Pictures, The Interview, Xbox, Xbox Videos, YouTube

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  • jkabtech 12:17 pm on January 10, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Answer, , interview   

    What to Say When You Don't Have a Good Answer in an Interview 

    Heather Yamada-HosleyYesterday 4:30pmFiled to: jobscareerjob searchjob huntworkinterviews537EditSend to EditorsPromoteShare to KinjaToggle Conversation toolsGo to permalink

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  • jkabtech 12:17 pm on August 6, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: interview, Kamkar, Superconference   

    Superconference Interview: Samy Kamkar 

    Samy Kamkar has an incredible arsenal of self-taught skills that have grown into a remarkable career as a security researcher. He dropped out of high school to found a company based on Open Source Software and became infamous for releasing the Samy worm on the MySpace platform. But in our minds Samy has far outpaced that notoriety with the hardware-based security exploits he’s uncovered over the last decade. And he’s got a great gift for explaining these hacks — from his credit card magstripe spoofing experiments to hacking keyless entry systems and garage door opener remotes — in great depth during his talk at the 2016 Hackaday Superconference.

    We pulled Samy aside after his talk to discuss how the security scene has grown up over the years and asked him to share his advice for people just coming up now. We’re happy to publish it for the first time today, it can be seen below.

    Now it’s your turn. The Call for Proposals is now open for the 2017 Hackaday Superconference. You don’t need to be Samy Kamkar to qualify for a talk. You just need an interesting story of hardware engineering, creativity in technical design, an adventure with product design, or a sordid tale of your prototyping experiences. We hope everyone with a story will submit their proposal, but for those who don’t tickets are now available. The Hackaday Superconference will take place in Pasadena, California on November 11th and 12th.

    Posted in cons, Interviews, security hacksTagged 2017 Hackaday Superconference, Hackaday SuperConference, samy kamkar Post navigation← Rotary Phones and the Birth of a NetworkHackaday Prize Entry: Pan And Tilt Sprinkler → 2 thoughts on “” Pener Tante says:July 26, 2017 at 2:14 pm

    This site is dead and it’s for a reason

    Report comment ReplyMike Szczys says:July 26, 2017 at 3:26 pm

    Wow, that’s pretty cold 😉

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  • jkabtech 6:16 pm on March 14, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: interview,   

    How to Pass a Programming Interview 

    This post started as the preparation material we send to our candidates, but we decided to post it publicly.

    Being a good programmer has a surprisingly small role in passing programming interviews. To be a productive programmer, you need to be able to solve large, sprawling problems over weeks and months. Each question in an interview, in contrast, lasts less than one hour. To do well in an interview, then, you need to be able to solve small problems quickly, under duress, while explaining your thoughts clearly. This is a different skill [1]. On top of this, interviewers are often poorly trained and inattentive (they would rather be programming), and ask questions far removed from actual work. They bring bias, pattern matching, and a lack of standardization.

    Running Triplebyte, I see this clearly. We interview engineers without looking at resumes, and fast-track them to on-sites at YC companies. We’ve interviewed over 1000 programmers in the last nine months. We focus heavily on practical programming, and let candidates pick one of several ways to be evaluated. This means we work with many (very talented) programmers without formal CS training. Many of these people do poorly on interviews. They eat large sprawling problems for breakfast, but they balk at 45-min algorithm challenges.

    The good news is that interviewing is a skill that can be learned. We’ve had success teaching candidates to do better on interviews. Indeed, the quality that most correlates with a Triplebyte candidate passing interviews at YC companies is not raw talent, but rather diligence. 

    I fundamentally do not believe that good programmers should have to learn special interviewing skills to do well on interviews. But the status quo is what it is. We’re working at Triplebyte to change this. If you’re interested in what we’re doing, we’d love you to check out our process. In the meantime, if you do want to get better at interviewing, this blog post describes how we think you can most effectively do so. 

    Enthusiasm has a huge impact on interview results. About 50% of the Triplebyte candidates who fail interviews at companies fail for non-technical reasons. This is usually described by the company as a “poor culture fit”. Nine times out of ten, however, culture fit just means enthusiasm for what a company does. Companies want candidates who are excited about their mission. This carries as much weight at many companies as technical skill. This makes sense. Excited employees will be happier and work harder.

    The problem is that this can be faked. Some candidates manage to convince every company they talk to that it’s their dream job, while others (who are genuinely excited) fail to convince anyone. We’ve seen this again and again. The solution is for everyone to get better at showing their enthusiasm. This is not permission to lie. But interviewing is like dating. No one wants to be told on a first date that they are one option among many, even though this is usually the case. Similarly, most programmers just want a good job with a good paycheck. But stating this in an interview is a mistake. The best approach is to prepare notes before an interview about what you find exciting about the company, and bring this up with each interviewer when they ask if you have any questions. A good source of ideas is to read the company’s recent blog posts and press releases and note the ones you find exciting.

    This idea seems facile. I imagine you are nodding along as you read this. But (as anyone who has ever interviewed can tell you) a surprisingly small percentage of applicants do this. Carefully preparing notes on why you find a company exciting really will increase your pass rate. You can even reference the notes during the interview. Bringing prepared notes shows preparation.

    A large percentage of interview questions feature data structures and algorithms. For better or worse, this is the truth. We gather question details from our candidates who interview at YC companies (we’ll be doing a in-depth analysis of this data in a future article), and algorithm questions make up over 70% of the questions that are asked. You do not need to be an expert, but knowing the following list of algorithms and data structures will help at most companies.

    Hash tablesLinked listsBreadth-first search, depth-first searchQuicksort, merge sortBinary search2D arraysDynamic arraysBinary search treesDynamic programmingBig-O analysis

    Depending on your background, this list may look trivial, or may look totally intimidating. That’s exactly the point. These are concepts that are far more common in interviews than they are in production web programming. If you’re self-taught or years out of school and these concepts are not familiar to you, you will do better in interviews if you study them. Even if you do know these things, refreshing your knowledge will help. A startlingly high percentage of interview questions reduce to breadth-first search or the use of a hash table to count uniques. You need to be able to write a BFS cold, and you need to understand how a hash table is implemented.

    Learning these things is not as hard as many of the people we talk to fear. Algorithms are usually described in academic language, and this can be off-putting. But at its core, nothing on this list is more complicated than the architecture of a modern web app. If you can build a web app (well), you can learn these things. The resource that I recommend is the book The Algorithm Design Manual by Steven Skiena. Chapters 3 through 5 do a great job of going over this material, in a straightforward way. It does use C and some math syntax, but it explains the material well. Coursera also has several good algorithms courses. This one, in particular, focuses on the concepts that are important in interviews.

    Studying algorithms and data structures helps not only because the material comes up in interviews, but also because the approach to problems taken in an algorithm course is the same approach that works best in interviews. Studying algorithms will get you in an interview mindset.

    Interviewers help candidates. They give hints, they respond to ideas, and they generally guide the process. But they don’t help all candidates equally. Some programmers are able to extract significant help, without the interviewer holding it against them. Others are judged harshly for any hints they are given. You want to be helped.

    This comes down to process and communication. If the interviewer likes your process and you communicate well with them, they will not mind helping. You can make this more likely by following a careful process. The steps I recommend are:

    Ask questionsTalk through a brute-force solutionTalk through an optimized solutionWrite code

    After you are asked an interview question, start by clarifying what was asked. This is the time to be pedantic. Clarify every ambiguity you can think of. Ask about edge cases. Bring up specific examples of input, and make sure you are correct about the expected output. Ask questions even if you’re almost sure you know the answers. This is useful because it gives you a chance to come up with edge cases and fully spec the problem (seeing how you handle edge-cases is one of the main things that interviewers look for when evaluating an interview), and also because it gives you a minute to collect your thoughts before you need to start solving the problem.

    Next, you should talk through the simplest brute-force solution to the problem that you can think of. You should talk, rather than jump right into coding, because you can move faster when talking, and it’s more engaging for the interviewer. If the interviewer is engaged, they will step in and offer pointers. If you retreat into writing code, however, you’ll miss this opportunity. 

    Candidates often skip the brute-force step, assuming that the brute-force solution to the problem is too obvious, or wrong. This is a mistake. Make sure that you always give a solution to the problem you’ve been asked (even if it takes exponential time, or an NSA super computer). When you’ve described a brute-force solution, ask the interviewer if they would like you to implement it, or come up with more efficient solution. Normally they will tell you to come up with a more efficient solution.

    The process for the more efficient solution is the same as for the brute force. Again talk, don’t write code, and bounce ideas off of the interviewer. Hopefully, the question will be similar to something you’ve seen, and you’ll know the answer. If that is not the case, it’s useful to think of what problems you’ve seen that are most similar, and bring these up with the interviewer. Most interview questions are slightly-obscured applications of classic CS algorithms. The interviewer will often guide you to this algorithm, but only if you begin the process.

    Finally, after both you and your interviewer agree that you have a good solution, you should write your code. Depending on the company, this may be on a computer or a whiteboard. But because you’ve already come up with the solution, this should be fairly straightforward. For extra points, ask your interviewer if they would like you to write tests.

    Programming interviews are primarily made up of programming questions, and that is what I have talked about so far. However, you may also encounter system design questions. Companies seem to like these especially for more experienced candidates. In a system design question, the candidate is asked how he or she would design a complex real-world system. Examples include designing Google maps, designing a social network, or designing an API for a bank.

    The first observation is that answering system design questions requires some specific knowledge. Obviously no one actually expects you to design Google maps (that took a lot of people a long time). But they do expect you to have some insight into aspects of such a design. The good news is that these questions usually focus on web backends, so you can make a lot of progress by reading about this area. An incomplete list of things to understand is:
    HTTP (at the protocol level) Databases (indexes, query planning) CDNsCaching (LRU cache, memcached, redis) Load balancersDistributed worker systemsYou need to understand these concepts. But more importantly, you need to understand how they fit together to form real systems. The best way to learn this is to read about how other engineers have used the concepts. The blog High Scalability is a great resource for this. It publishes detailed write-ups of the back-end architecture at real companies. You can read about how every concept on the list above is used in real systems.

    Once you’ve done this reading, answering system design questions is a matter of process. Start at the highest level, and move downward. At each level, ask your interviewer for specifications (should you suggest a simple starting point, or talk about what a mature system might look like?) and talk about several options (applying the ideas from your reading). Discussing tradeoffs in your design is key. Your interviewer cares less about whether your design is good in itself, and more about whether you are able to talk about the trade-offs (positives and negatives) of your decisions. Practice this.

    The third type of question you may encounter is the experience question. This is where the interviewer asks you to talk about a programming project that you completed in the past. The mistake that many engineers make on this question is to talk about a technically interesting side-project. Many programmers choose to talk about implementing a neural network classifier, or writing a Twitter grammar bot. These are bad choices because it’s very hard for the interviewer to judge their scope. Many candidates exaggerate simple side projects (sometimes that never actually worked), and the interviewer has no way to tell if you are doing this.

    The solution is to choose a project that produced results, and highlight the results. This often involves picking a less technically interesting project, but it’s worth it. Think (ahead of time) of the programming you’ve done that had the largest real-world impact. If you’ve written a iOS game, and 50k people have downloaded it, the download number makes it a good option. If you’ve written an admin interface during an internship that was deployed to the entire admin staff, the deployment makes it a good thing to talk about. Selecting a practical project will also communicate to the company that you focus on actual work. Programmer too focused on interesting tech is an anti-pattern that companies screen against (these programmers are sometimes not productive).

    I recommend that you use a dynamic language like Python, Ruby or JavaScript during interviews. Of course, you should use whatever language you know best. But we find that many people try interviewing in C , C++ or Java, under the impression these are the “real’ programming languages. Several classic books on interviewing recommend that programmers choose Java or C++. At startups at least, we’ve found that this is bad advice. Candidates do better when using dynamic languages. This is true, I think, because of dynamic languages’ compact syntax, flexible typing, and list and hash literals. They are permissive languages. This can be a liability when writing complex systems (a highly debatable point), but it’s great when trying to cram binary search onto a whiteboard.

    No matter what language you use, it’s helpful to mention work in other languages. An anti-pattern that companies screen against is people who only know one language. If you do only know one language, you have to rely on your strength in that language. But if you’ve done work or side-projects in multiple languages, be sure to bring this up when talking to your interviewers. If you have worked in lower-level languages like C, C++, Go, or Rust, talking about this will particularly help.

    Java, C# and PHP are a problematic case. As we described in our last blog post, we’ve uncovered bias against these languages in startups. We have data showing that programmers using these languages in the interview pass at a lower rate. This is not fair, but it is the truth. If you have other options, I recommend against using these languages in interviews with startups.

    You can get much better at interviewing by practicing answering questions. This is true because interviews are stressful, but stress harms performance. The solution is practice. Interviewing becomes less stressful with exposure. This happens naturally with experience. Even within a single job search, we find that candidates often fail their initial interviews, and then pass more as their confidence builds. If stress is something you struggle with, I recommend that you jumpstart this process by practicing interview stress. Get a list of interview questions (the book Cracking the Coding Interview is one good source) and solve them. Set a 20-minute timer on each question, and race to answer. Practice writing the answers on a whiteboard (not all companies require this, but it’s the worst case, so you should practice it). A pen on paper is a pretty good simulation of a whiteboard. If you have friends who can help you prepare, taking turns interviewing each other is great. Reading a lot of interview questions has the added benefit of providing you ideas to use when in actual interviews. A surprising number of questions are re-used (in full or in part).

    Even experienced (and stress-free) candidates will benefit from this. Interviewing is a fundamentally different skill from working as a programmer, and it can atrophy. But experienced programers often (reasonably) feel that they should not have to prepare for interviews. They study less. This is why junior candidates often actually do better on interview questions than experienced candidates. Companies know this, and, paradoxically, some tell us they set lower bars on the programming questions for experienced candidates.

    Credentials bias interviewers. Triplebyte candidates who have worked at a top company or studied at a top school go on to pass interviews at a 30% higher rate than programmers who don’t have these credentials (for a given level of performance on our credential-blind screen). I don’t like this. It’s not meritocratic and it sucks, but if you have these credentials, it’s in your interest to make sure that your interviewers know this. You can’t trust that they’ll read your resume.

    If you’ve ever read fund-raising advice for founders, you’ll know that getting the 1st VC to make an investment offer is the hardest part. Once you have one offer, more come pouring in. The same is true of job offers. If you already have an offer, be sure to mention this in interviews. Mentioning other offers in an interview heavily biases the interviewer in your favor.

    This brings up the strategy of making a list of the companies you’re interested in, and setting up interviews in reverse order of interest. Doing well earlier in the process will increase your probability of getting an offer from you number one choice. You should do this.

    Passing interviews is a skill. Being a great programmer helps, but it’s only part of the picture. Everyone fails some of their interviews, and preparing properly can help everyone pass more. Enthusiasm is paramount, and research helps with this. As many programmers fail for lacking enthusiasm as fail for technical reasons. Interviewers help candidates during interviews, and if you follow a good process and communicate clearly, they will help you. Practice always helps. Reading lots of interview questions and inuring yourself to interview stress will lead to more offers.

    This situation is not ideal. Preparing for interviews is work, and forcing programmers to learn skills other than building great software wastes everyone’s time. Companies should improve their interview processes to be less biased by academic CS, memorized facts, and rehearsed interview processes. This is what we’re doing at Triplebyte. We help programmers get jobs without looking at resumes. We let programmers pick one of several areas in which to be evaluated, and we study and improve our process over time. We’d love to help you get a job at a startup, without jumping through these hoops. You can get started here. But the status quo is what it is. Until this changes, programmers should know how to prepare.

    Thanks to Jared Friedman, Emmett Shear, Garry Tan, Alexis Ohanian and Daniel Gackle for reading drafts of this.
    Footnote [1]: This is not to say that interview performance does not correlate with programing skill. It does. But the correlation is far weaker than most companies assume, and factors other than programing skill explain a large part of interview variance. ?


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  • jkabtech 5:58 pm on February 27, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: frustrated, interview,   

    Feds ‘frustrated’ by Tim Cook interview: Official 

    Thursday, 25 Feb 2016 | 2:28 PM ETCNBC.com

    A senior law enforcement official told CNBC that officials are “frustrated” by Apple CEO Tim Cook’s interview on ABC News Wednesday, particularly Cook’s argument that the FBI’s proposal in the dispute about access to a San Bernardino, California, shooter’s iPhone would affect “hundreds of millions of users.”

    Officials point to the text of the court order issued last week and argue that their proposal is “a solution for a single device by serial number in a single case.”

    The official also responded to Cook’s analogy that creating new software to access the iPhone of San Bernardino shooter Syed Farook would be akin to creating the “software equivalent of cancer.” Cook’s argument is that new software designed just to eliminate the security features of Farook’s iPhone would inevitably be targeted by hackers and thieves and possibly escape into the control of hostile third parties.

    Apple CEO Tim Cook Chip Somodevilla | Getty Images News | Getty Images

    That doesn’t convince many officials in Washington.

    “If you’re talking cancer cells,” the official said, responding to Cook’s analogy, “in this case [Apple] would create the cancer cell, they would use the cancer cell and they would destroy the cancer cell, in their own facility, where you would think they have very good security.”

    That private assessment by a government official differed from the public tone of FBI Director James Comey in testimony Thursday before the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence. In his public remarks, Comey went out of his way to praise Apple for its cooperation before the dispute went public last week.

    He declined an opening offered by a member of Congress to repeat government claims that Apple is acting out of concern for its business model. And Comey suggested he could see both sides of the issue, saying the dispute “is the hardest question I’ve seen in government” and emphasizing the need for conversation and negotiation.

    For his part, Apple CEO Cook used his ABC News interview to frame the debate in terms of the fundamental aspects of American life. “This is not about one phone — this is about the future,” he said. “It’s about freedom of expression and freedom of speech, these are core principles in America.”

    And Cook also worried aloud about the potential consequences of being forced to write new software for the government. “If a court can ask us to write this piece of software, think about what else they can ask us to write,” he said. “Maybe it’s an operating system for surveillance. Maybe it’s the ability for the law enforcement to turn on the camera. I mean, I don’t know where this stops.”

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