Two out of five U.S. infants from low-income families are not vaccinated against rotavirus

Rotavirus (RV) infection is the leading cause of diarrheal disease in young children worldwide.According to the U.S. immunization schedule, infants should receive two (Rotarix) or three (Rotateq) doses between the ages of 6¬†weeks and 8¬†months. However, a study published in Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics suggests that 40% of U.S. infants from low-income families do not […]

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Sea level rise threatens larger number of people than earlier estimated

More people live close to sea coast than earlier estimated, assess researchers in a new study. These people are the most vulnerable to the rise of the sea level as well as to the increased number of floods and intensified storms. By using recent increased resolution datasets, Aalto University researchers estimate that 1.9 billion inhabitants, […]

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Oxytocin can improve compassion in people with symptoms of PTSD

Oxytocin — “the love hormone” — may enhance compassion of people suffering from symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), according to new study conducted at the University of Haifa and Rambam Health Care Campus: “The fact that the present study found, that Oxytocin may improvement compassion among patients with post-traumatic stress disorder toward women, provides […]

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Green tea and iron, bad combination

Green tea is touted for its many health benefits as a powerful antioxidant, but experiments in a laboratory mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease suggest that consuming green tea along with dietary iron may actually lessen green tea’s benefits.“If you drink green tea after an iron-rich meal, the main compound in the tea will bind […]

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What makes the brain tick so fast?

Surprisingly complex interactions between neurotransmitter receptors and other key proteins help explain the brain’s ability to process information with lightning speed, according to a new study.Scientists at McGill University, working with collaborators at the universities of Oxford and Liverpool, combined experimental techniques to examine fast-acting protein macromolecules, known as AMPA receptors, which are a major […]

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