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  • jkabtech 8:17 pm on March 26, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Difference, , which,   

    Windows 10 Home vs. Windows 10 Pro: What’s the Difference, and Which One Is for You? 

    Microsoft Windows 10 for desktop, the successor to Windows 8.1, comes in two versions: Windows 10 Pro and Windows 10 Home. This is a stark contrast to earlier versions of Windows, which came in as many as seven editions. Of the two editions, Windows 10 Pro, as you may have guessed, has more features. Unlike Windows 7 and 8.1, in which the basic variant was markedly crippled with fewer features than its professional counterpart, Windows 10 Home packs in a large set of new features that should suffice most users’ needs. This begs the question, which among Windows 10 Pro and Windows 10 Home is the right version for you.

    What do you get with Windows 10 Home
    Windows 10 Home is the basic variant of Windows 10. It comes with a number of new features including the revamped Start Menu. The company decided to chop it off from Windows 8 three years ago, but on popular demand, this feature is making a return to the desktop operating system. You also get a full-fledged version of Cortana, the digital voice assistant formerly exclusively available on Windows Phone. Other than that, the Home edition also gets you features like Battery Saver, TPM support, and company’s new biometrics security feature called Windows Hello.

    Battery Saver, for those unfamiliar, is a feature that makes your system more power efficient. It does so by limiting the background activity on the device. A TPM is a microchip that offers additional security-related functions. Many motherboard manufacturers install TPM chip on their device. Microsoft assures that if your motherboard has that chip, Windows 10 Home will provide support for it.

    Home users will also be able to utilise the all-new Virtual Desktops option and Snap assist feature with up to 4 apps on one screen. Furthermore, they can also give a whirl to Continuum, a flagship feature of Windows 10 that lets you quickly switch from desktop mode to tablet mode. You are also bestowed with Microsoft Edge, the brand new browser in town.

    The Home edition also supports Windows Update – eligible to snag automatic updates from Microsoft – and also provides security measures such as Microsoft Passport. The aforementioned features should fit an average Joe’s bill as the company is providing all the essential features in the basic variant.

    However, if you crave for more sophisticated protection, or if your work requires features such as support for side-loading of business apps, the Home edition could leave a lot to be desired, and you are better off with the Pro edition.

    What do you get with Windows 10 Pro
    The Pro edition of Windows 10, in addition to all of Home edition’s features, offers sophisticated connectivity and privacy tools such as Domain Join, Group Policy Management, Bitlocker, Enterprise Mode Internet Explorer (EMIE), Assigned Access 8.1, Remote Desktop, Client Hyper-V, and Direct Access.

    Assigned Access 8.1, for instance, allows you to lock user accounts and prevent them from accessing specific apps. BitLocker, on the other hand, is one of the most powerful disk-encryption tools on Windows. It lets you encrypt your external USB-drives. You also get tools that facilitate seamless connectivity while joining Azure Active Directory, and a Business Store for Windows 10. So should you get the Pro edition instead?

    It all comes down to this: do you need features such as Client Hyper-V, which is a built-in virtualisation solution in Windows. Does your work require you to connect to a Windows domain? If yes, you should purchase the Pro edition. Else, the Home edition is what you need.

    View the Original article

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  • jkabtech 4:17 am on August 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Donut, , Prevail?, which   

    Donut Vs. Pizza: Which One Will Prevail? 

    Patrick AllanToday 12:00pmFiled to: Donut VSVideoVideosComedy33EditPromoteShare to KinjaToggle Conversation toolsGo to permalink

    The ultimate life hack is deciding which foods are and are not better than a donut. Welcome to Donut VS! The only show that pits a donut versus other foods in a glorious battle for glory. For this inaugural episode: donut vs. pizza. Who will come out on top?

    Have an idea for other tasty foods that should take on the mighty donut next? I’m hungry for more, so let me know in the comments below!

    Patrick Allanpatrick.allan

    View the Original article

     
  • jkabtech 2:17 am on March 13, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , which   

    Scientists find brain cells that know which end is up 

    People are intuitive physicists, knowing from birth how objects under the influence of gravity are likely to fall, topple or roll. In a new study, scientists have found the brain cells apparently responsible for this innate wisdom.

    In a part of the brain responsible for recognizing color, texture and shape, Johns Hopkins University researchers found neurons that used large-scale environmental cues to infer the direction of gravity. The findings, forthcoming this month in the journal Current Biology, and just posted online, suggest these cells help humans orient themselves and predict how objects will behave.

    “Gravity is a strong ubiquitous force in our world,” said senior author Charles E. Connor, a professor of neuroscience and director of the university’s Zanvyl Krieger Mind/Brain Institute. “Our results show how the direction of gravity can be derived from visual cues, providing critical information about object physics as well as additional cues for maintaining posture and balance.”

    Connor, along with lead author Siavash Vaziri, a former Johns Hopkins postdoctoral fellow, studied individual cells in the object area of the rhesus monkey brain, a remarkably close model for the organization and function of human vision. They measured responses of each cell to about 500 abstract three-dimensional shapes presented on a computer monitor. The shapes ranged from small objects to large landscapes and interiors.

    They found that a given cell would respond to many different stimuli, especially large planes and sharp, extended edges. What tied these stimuli together was their alignment in the same tilted rectilinear reference frame. These cells, sensitive to different tilts, could provide a continuous signal for the direction of gravity, even as a person constantly moves.

    In other words, Connor said, these neurons could help people understand which way is up.

    “The world does not appear to rotate when the head tilts left or right or gaze tilts up or down, even though the visual image changes dramatically,” he said. “That perceptual stability must depend on signals like these that provide a constant sense of how the visual environment is oriented.”

    The researchers’ initial discovery of cells sensitive to large-scale shape, reported in Neuron in 2014, was surprising because they found them in a brain region long regarded as dedicated exclusively to object vision. The new findings make sense of this anatomical juxtaposition, since knowing the gravitational reference frame is critical for predicting how objects will behave.

    “When we dive after a ball in tennis, the whole visual world tilts, but we maintain our sense of how the ball will fall and how to aim our next shot,” Connor said. “The visual cortex generates an incredibly rich understanding of object structure, materials, strength, elasticity, balance, and movement potential. These are the things that make us such expert intuitive physicists.”

    View the original article here

     
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