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  • jkabtech 12:17 pm on April 13, 2018 Permalink |
    Tags: , , Miner, Mini-Computer, , turns   

    Raspberry Pi Malware Turns the Mini-Computer Into Cryptocurrency Miner 

    Highlights The distribution of malware started in second half of May The malware specifically targets Raspberry Pi The name of cryptocurrency mined has not been disclosed

    If you are one of those people who use the default “Pi” username on Raspberry Pi, it is time to pay attention. Dr. Web, an anti-malware company, has now discovered a new malware that goes by the name Linux.MulDrop.14 and turns Raspberry Pi into a cryptocurrency miner, resulting in production of money for hackers from your machine.

    In order for the Raspberry Pi to catch the malware, the device is required to be kept on with SSH ports open, as pointed out in a report by The Register. The Dr. Web describes the malware by saying the trojan “is a script that contains a compressed and encrypted application designed to mine cryptocurrency.”

    Dr. Web says that the malware changes the passwords of the devices that it infects and then unpacks and launches a miner. Then, the malware, in an infinite loop, starts searching for network nodes with an open port 22, as per the antivirus company.

    “After establishing a connection with them via the SSH protocol, the Trojan attempts to run a copy of itself on them,” it said.

    The Linux.MulDrop.14 malware specifically targets Raspberry Pi and the distribution of this malware reportedly started in second half of May. While the name of the cryptocurrency has not been mentioned, it is expected that several machines would be targeted to work collectively as a single Raspberry Pi does not carry the hardware capable of handling the mining process efficiently.

    It seems like the affordable mini-computer that captured the imagination of tech world when it was first introduced has now managed to attract attention from hackers as well

    For the latest tech news and reviews, follow Gadgets 360 on Twitter, Facebook, and subscribe to our YouTube channel.

    Tags: Raspberry Pi Malware, Raspberry Pi, PC, Mini Computer Malware

    View the Original article

     
  • jkabtech 8:17 pm on September 30, 2017 Permalink |
    Tags: , , turns   

    Roy Hill turns to Azure, SAP for IoT insights 

    Miner’s computer systems take shape.

    Gina Rinehart’s Roy Hill mine has spent the past year co-funding and piloting a data science platform created using Microsoft Azure components including the Azure IoT hub.

    The iron ore miner is the first user of a ‘business analytics’ platform and capability that was co-developed and funded by systems integrator Ajilon Australia alongside Roy Hill.

    It is understood the system is being mostly used to analyse sensor data from heavy mobile equipment (HME) and locomotives used to haul ore from pit to port.

    Typically, the data is being aggregated at Roy Hill – such as in a data historian or ‘data lake’ – and then fed through the business analytics system and up into Azure.

    However, the miner is understood to be also testing analytics on data that is streamed from the field in as near to real-time as is feasible. Ajilon’s national solution lead Peter Hawkins told iTnews this wasn’t yet a “production use case but it’s working”.

    Hawkins said that around the same time as Ajilon began building out an analytics practice in 2015, it learned of Roy Hill’s interest in trialling similar technology.

    The two partnered, and worked closely with Microsoft Azure engineers in Redmond to create a “templated, repeatable” analytics platform based on Microsoft components.

    “We had a direct line into Redmond and were able to call on their engineers building this stuff to resolve some of the challenges

    View the Original article

     
  • jkabtech 4:17 am on September 30, 2017 Permalink |
    Tags: , , , , , turns,   

    Melbourne Uni turns to wi-fi to limit students to their own faculties 

    Micro DC panel discussion at Cloud & DC Edge 2017. Reveals ‘edge’ processing plans and projects.

    The University of Melbourne is considering a plan to dissuade students from congregating in libraries outside their areas of study by limiting their access to campus wi-fi in those places.

    It is understood that undisclosed faculties have raised concerns that their students are unable to access faculty library resources due to other students using the spaces.

    The university is hoping to tap its campus-wide wi-fi network – which has about 5000 access points – to identify the study areas of students entering or sat in faculty libraries “on-the-fly”.

    Students entering a faculty library not related to their area of study could find their wi-fi access limited as capacity is prioritised to students actually enrolled in that faculty’s studies.

    “Deans of some faculties are not happy that their libraries are being filled with all sorts of students who aren’t necessarily in their faculty, so their own students are missing out,” data centre and facility services manager Will Belcher told the Cloud & DC Edge Summit.

    “They want to try and use the data from the wireless access points and controllers – we track

    View the Original article

     
  • jkabtech 6:08 am on July 14, 2017 Permalink |
    Tags: , , turns   

    Roy Hill turns to Azure, SAP for IoT insights 

    Miner’s computer systems take shape.

    Gina Rinehart’s Roy Hill mine has spent the past year co-funding and piloting a data science platform created using Microsoft Azure components including the Azure IoT hub.

    The iron ore miner is the first user of a ‘business analytics’ platform and capability that was co-developed and funded by systems integrator Ajilon Australia alongside Roy Hill.

    It is understood the system is being mostly used to analyse sensor data from heavy mobile equipment (HME) and locomotives used to haul ore from pit to port.

    Typically, the data is being aggregated at Roy Hill – such as in a data historian or ‘data lake’ – and then fed through the business analytics system and up into Azure.

    However, the miner is understood to be also testing analytics on data that is streamed from the field in as near to real-time as is feasible. Ajilon’s national solution lead Peter Hawkins told iTnews this wasn’t yet a “production use case but it’s working”.

    Hawkins said that around the same time as Ajilon began building out an analytics practice in 2015, it learned of Roy Hill’s interest in trialling similar technology.

    The two partnered, and worked closely with Microsoft Azure engineers in Redmond to create a “templated, repeatable” analytics platform based on Microsoft components.

    “We had a direct line into Redmond and were able to call on their engineers building this stuff to resolve some of the challenges

    View the Original article

     
  • jkabtech 2:08 pm on July 13, 2017 Permalink |
    Tags: , , , , , turns,   

    Melbourne Uni turns to wi-fi to limit students to their own faculties 

    Micro DC panel discussion at Cloud & DC Edge 2017. Reveals ‘edge’ processing plans and projects.

    The University of Melbourne is considering a plan to dissuade students from congregating in libraries outside their areas of study by limiting their access to campus wi-fi in those places.

    It is understood that undisclosed faculties have raised concerns that their students are unable to access faculty library resources due to other students using the spaces.

    The university is hoping to tap its campus-wide wi-fi network – which has about 5000 access points – to identify the study areas of students entering or sat in faculty libraries “on-the-fly”.

    Students entering a faculty library not related to their area of study could find their wi-fi access limited as capacity is prioritised to students actually enrolled in that faculty’s studies.

    “Deans of some faculties are not happy that their libraries are being filled with all sorts of students who aren’t necessarily in their faculty, so their own students are missing out,” data centre and facility services manager Will Belcher told the Cloud & DC Edge Summit.

    “They want to try and use the data from the wireless access points and controllers – we track

    View the Original article

     
  • jkabtech 5:55 am on January 30, 2016 Permalink |
    Tags: , , , , receiver, scanning, turns, walkietalkie   

    Jailbreak firmware turns cheap digital walkie-talkie into DMR scanning receiver 

    ? LiveJournal

    In the last years, DMR and MOTOTRBO (a.k.a. TRBO a Motorola Solutions branded DMR Radios ) has become a very popular digital voice mode on the UHF and VHF bands and the MD380 radio is the latest cheap DMR walkie-talkie to come out of China.The question is, is it any good? The longer answer is slightly more complicated, and involves discussing the difference in price between this radio and other more expensive, but higher quality, radios. But i can tell you that a group of hams here recently purchased the Beihaidao DMR radio (also sold under brands like Tytera, KERUIER or Retevis) and have been having excellent results with them.

    Every once in a great while, a piece of radio gear catches the attention of a prolific hardware guru and is reverse engineered. A few years ago, it was the RTL-SDR, and since then, software defined radios became the next big thing. Last Shmoocon, Travis Goodspeed presented his reverse engineering of the MD380 digital handheld radio.

    The hack has since been published in PoC||GTFO 0x10 (donwload site) with all the gory details that turn a radio under $200 into the first hardware scanner for digital mobile radio. For comparison, the cost of a Motorola MotoTRBO UHF XPR 7550 DMR radio can reach $800.
    The MD380 is a fairly basic radio with two main chips: an STM32F405 with a megabyte of Flash and 192k of RAM, and an HR C5000 baseband. The STM32 has both JTAG and a ROM bootloader, but both of these are protected by the Readout Device Protection (RDP). Getting around the RDP is the very definition of a jailbreak.


    In Digital Mobile Radio, audio is sent through either a public talk group or a private contact. The radio is usually set to only one talk group, and so it’s not really possible to listen in on other talk groups without changing settings. A patch for promiscuous mode – a mode that puts all talk groups through the speaker – is now out.

    Here in the US Project 25 (P25 or APCO-25) is a suite of standards for digital radio communications for federal users,  but for state/county and local public safety organizations including police dispatch channels are using Mototrbo DMR digital standard.

    How to install the Hacked Firmware for the MD380. ( Here is a YouTube Video on the Update Process to the Jailbreak of the Beihaidao Radio)

    You need source code from https://github.com/travisgoodspeed/md380tools this download  does not ship with firmware to avoid legal trouble. Instead it grabs firmware from the Internet, decrypts it, and applies patches to that revision.

    The output files have a .img extension when unencrypted, and a .bin extension when packaged for the official firmware updater.
    If you use the Tytera Updater you need .binHere is a description of the files and procedure.* prom-public.img and prom-public.bin: patched to monitor all talk groups.* prom-private.img and prom-private.bin: patched to monitor all talk groups, private calls.* experiment.img and experiment.bin: patched to monitor all talk groups, private calls, and sideload alternate firmware.You can install any of these patched firmware files into your MD380 by using the respective .bin file with the Ty$* Turn off your MD380 using the volume knob.* Attach the Tytera USB cable to the SP and MIC ports of your MD380.* Attach the Tytera USB cable to your host computer.* Hold down the PTT and the button above the PTT button (*not* the button with the “M” on it).* Turn on your MD380 using the volume knob.* Release the buttons on the radio.* The status LED should be on and alternating between red and green, indicating you’re in flash upgrade mode.* Start the Tytera “Upgrade.exe” program.* Click “Open Update File” and choose one of the .bin files produced from the process above.* Click “Download Update File” and wait for the flash update process to finish. It takes less than a minute.* Turn off your MD380 using the volume knob.* Disconnect the USB cable from your MD380 and host computer.* Turn the MD380 back on, and you should see the “PoC||GTFO” welcome screen.

    You’re running patched firmware!

    var _top100q = _top100q || []; _top100q.push([‘setAccount’, ‘1111412’]); _top100q.push([‘trackPageview’]); ;(function () { LJ.injectScript(‘//ad.rambler.ru/static/green2.min.js’) .done(function () { _green.defineSlot(‘8990’, [1, 1], ‘rambler_ad_counter_145411388258’); _green.display(‘rambler_ad_counter_145411388258’); }); }());

    View the original article here

     
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