Tagged: million Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • jkabtech 4:17 am on March 19, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Anymore?', Cares, Couple, , Hundred, million   

    Xbox One Lead Engineer: ‘Who Cares About a Couple of Hundred Million PCs Anymore?’ 

    Highlights According to ex-Xbox One lead engineer, all CPU innovation is on mobile However, power efficiency gains do help reduce costs on PC gaming servers Game developers, he opines, don’t make full use of PC hardware

    At the Develop Conference 2017, the one-time lead engineer on the Xbox One and Xbox Live founder Boyd Multerer stated that mobile devices are driving innovation in CPUs.

    View the Original article

    Advertisements
     
  • jkabtech 4:17 am on November 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Maersk's, million,   

    Maersk’s NotPetya losses could hit $378 million 

    Three businesses hard hit by attack.

    Danish shipping giant AP Moller-Maersk will book losses in the hundreds of millions of dollars after three of its businesses fell victim to the NotPetya destructive malware attack in June this year.

    In its interim report

    View the Original article

     
  • jkabtech 8:17 pm on October 26, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: addresses, captures, , , million, spambot   

    Massive spambot captures 711 million email addresses 

    Largest-ever data dump.

    A massive trove of email addresses used by spammers has been published online.

    It came to light after a French security researcher known as Benkow pointed the Australian operator of leaked credentials check site HaveIBeenPwned.com, Troy Hunt, to a server called Onliner Spambot.

    The server, hosted in the Netherlands, contained a vast amount of email addresses stored in database files without any access controls, making the data available to anyone.

    Benkow said the Onliner Spambot has been active since 2016, and was used to spread the credentials-stealing Ursnif banking trojan. 

    The largest Onliner Spambot file is 14GB. An Australian-specific email address database contained 12.5 million rows, Hunt said.

    Overall Hunt tallied up some 711 million email addresses in spam databases and said it comprises the largest data set ever loaded into HaveIBeenPwned.

    A large amount of the listed addresses in the Onliner dump are paired with mail server account passwords.

    With account passwords, Onliner is able to send spam from user accounts via their internet providers’s mail servers, making them appear as legitimate messages that bypass anti-junk mail measures.

    Hunt noted the email addresses with passwords matched those leaked in the 2012 LinkedIn data breach.

    The Onliner Spambot lists also contain many email addresses that appear to have been scraped from websites.

    These addresses are often malformed due to bad parsing by the web scraper. Hunt said this means the actual number of email addresses for real humans in the databases is somewhat less than 711 million.

    Benkow was able to identify a list of two million addresses as having originated from a Facebook phishing campaign.

    As of writing, it is not known who is behind the Onliner Spambot.

    View the Original article

     
  • jkabtech 12:17 pm on September 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , million,   

    Avaya to sell networking business for $131 million 

    Extreme Networks emerges as stalking horse bidder.

    Avaya is set to sell its networking business to Extreme Networks for US$100 million (A$131.7 million) as it restructures to stave off bankruptcy.

    The vendor – which filed for chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in January to reorganise its business – got into the networking market after buying a slice of Nortel in 2009 under similar circumstances.

    Avaya said other “interested parties” could still bid for its networking business, and if they did Extreme’s offer would “set the floor value” in an auction process.

    Any purchase of the assets is expected to close by June 30 this year.

    “As the stalking horse bidder, Extreme will be entitled to a break-up fee and expense reimbursement, if it ultimately does not prevail as the successful bidder at the required auction for Avaya’s assets,” Extreme Networks said in a statement.

    Extreme CEO Ed Meyercord said he expected Avaya’s networking business “to generate over US$200 million in annual revenue”.

    He said it would increase the company’s market share and “offer new opportunities for customers”.

    Avaya’s A/NZ managing director Peter Chidiac sought to reassure customers and partners in a separate statement.

    “While we understand this announcement may cause uncertainty in the market, we want to assure our Australian and New Zealand customers and partners there will be no change to the way we interact with and support them during the sale and ultimate transition process,” he said.

    View the Original article

     
  • jkabtech 10:08 pm on July 13, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , million,   

    Avaya to sell networking business for $131 million 

    Extreme Networks emerges as stalking horse bidder.

    Avaya is set to sell its networking business to Extreme Networks for US$100 million (A$131.7 million) as it restructures to stave off bankruptcy.

    The vendor – which filed for chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in January to reorganise its business – got into the networking market after buying a slice of Nortel in 2009 under similar circumstances.

    Avaya said other “interested parties” could still bid for its networking business, and if they did Extreme’s offer would “set the floor value” in an auction process.

    Any purchase of the assets is expected to close by June 30 this year.

    “As the stalking horse bidder, Extreme will be entitled to a break-up fee and expense reimbursement, if it ultimately does not prevail as the successful bidder at the required auction for Avaya’s assets,” Extreme Networks said in a statement.

    Extreme CEO Ed Meyercord said he expected Avaya’s networking business “to generate over US$200 million in annual revenue”.

    He said it would increase the company’s market share and “offer new opportunities for customers”.

    Avaya’s A/NZ managing director Peter Chidiac sought to reassure customers and partners in a separate statement.

    “While we understand this announcement may cause uncertainty in the market, we want to assure our Australian and New Zealand customers and partners there will be no change to the way we interact with and support them during the sale and ultimate transition process,” he said.

    View the Original article

     
  • jkabtech 11:46 pm on June 11, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , million, moved, rejected, transfers   

    NY Fed first rejected cyberheist transfers, then moved $81 million 

    View the Original article

     
  • jkabtech 10:31 pm on June 11, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: denies, , million, , , , ,   

    Twitter denies reports of 32 million records, passwords were stolen or leaked 

    userAction: window.ua,’shareButtons’: shareButtons,containerID: ‘social-tools-panel’,showCounts : ‘none’,iconsOnly: ‘true’,deviceType: ‘auto’,onSendDone: CNBC_Gigya_Omniture.onSendDoneBottom // onSendDone method is called after Gigya finishes the publishing process.,onConnectionAdded: CNBC_Gigya_Omniture.onConnectionAdded // Fired whenever a user is connected to a provider,onConnectionRemoved: CNBC_Gigya_Omniture.onConnectionRemoved,onLogin: CNBC_Gigya_Omniture.trackLoginEvent // call trackLoginEvent when Social Login finishes successfully,onLogout: CNBC_Gigya_Omniture.onLogout,showEmailButton:false,moreEnabledProviders: moreEnabledProviders

    View the Original article

     
  • jkabtech 6:51 am on April 29, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , million, ,   

    Report: 1.5 million Verizon customers hacked 

    itemsPerPage:1 ,itemsPerTransition:1 ,speed:500 ,swipable:true ,nextPrevLinks:true ,container: ‘multi_promo_103495731_1’ ,currentNodeClass: ‘currentNode’ ,lazyLoad: false ,lazyLoadNext: false,responsive:false

    View the Original article

     
  • jkabtech 1:20 am on March 29, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , million, ,   

    Report: 1.5 million Verizon customers hacked 

    Thursday, 24 Mar 2016 | 4:22 PM ETCNBC.com

    A pedestrian talks on his cell phone while walking past the Verizon Communications Inc. headquarters in New York. Andrew Harrer | Bloomberg | Getty ImagesA pedestrian talks on his cell phone while walking past the Verizon Communications Inc. headquarters in New York.

    More than 1.5 million Verizon Enterprise customers had their contact information leaked on an underground cybercrime forum this week, according to cybersecurity blogger Brian Krebs.

    A security vulnerability, now fixed, provided an opening for the attacker, the business-to-business arm of the mobile and telecom giant told KrebsoOnSecurity. The breach involved basic contact information, not propriety network information, the company told Krebs.

    Prices of the customer data ranged from $10,000 to $100,000, Krebs reported.

    Verizon, used by almost all Fortune 500 companies, is widely known for its cybersecurity prowess, and releases an annual report on avoiding cyberthreats, Krebs wrote.

    Verizon told CNBC that impacted Verizon Enterprise customers are being notified, and no data about consumer customers was involved.

    For the full story, read more at KrebsOnSecurity.com.

    — CNBC’s Ryan Ruggiero contributed to this report.

    SHOW COMMENTS Please add a username to view or add commentsPublic Username for Commenting

    View the original article here

     
  • jkabtech 12:17 pm on March 3, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: compensation, , , million,   

    LinkedIn set to pay $13 million compensation over its email persistence 

    shutterstock_259035356

    If you’re a member of LinkedIn then you’ll already know that the professional networking site likes to send out a large number of emails on a regular basis.

    And, if you’re anything like me, you probably delete the vast majority without ever opening them.

    But you may have received one on Friday, 2 October, that is worth a read.

    The message in question details LinkedIn’s plans to pay $13 million in compensation after some members complained that the company was sending too many messages on their behalf.

    The issue surrounds the company’s Add Connections service, a feature which allows members to sync their list of email contacts with LinkedIn and see who else is using the service. Then, the person can choose one or more of those contacts and invite them to connect on the site.

    To facilitate that, LinkedIn sends each prospective connection an email, letting them know that the person wishes to network with them.

    So far, quite a useful service.

    The problem, however – at least for LinkedIn – was the fact that it then chased up anyone who didn’t connect by sending a further two emails.

    And that, in the eyes of some members, constituted spam.

    Not spam sent by LinkedIn mind, but spam that appeared to be sent by the person trying to connect. Hence, in 2013, a class action lawsuit arose in California which claimed the site was “hacking” the email accounts of members who had agreed to one, and only one, email being sent on their behalf.

    Though LinkedIn denied the hacking claim at the time, and maintained that it has done nothing wrong since – recently telling Business Insider that the accusations were false but its email-sending policy could have been clearer – it has now agreed to compensate qualifying members. Those who had accounts on LinkedIn between September 2011 and October 2014 and sent emails through the Add Connections feature are in line for a share of the $13 million fund that is also designed to cover legal fees of up to $3.25 million.

    According to the offical website for the Perkins v. LinkedIn Corporation class action settlement, the maximum payout any member can receive will be $1,500. With compensation dependant on how many members make an approved claim, actual payouts are likely to be much, much smaller.

    In fact, having rubbed its crystal ball, LinkedIn appears to have predicted the possibility of members actually receiving less than $10 each, a scenario under which it has promised to add an additional $750,000 to the total fund.

    Of course there is a great chance that the number of claimants will be so large that the administration costs will wipe the fund out all by themselves. If that proves to be the case, all of the money would instead be given to one or more of Access Now, the Electronic Privacy Information Center and Network for Teaching Entrepreneurship:

    If the pro rata amount is so small that it cannot be distributed in a way that is economically feasible, payments will be made, instead, to Cy Pres Recipients selected by the Parties and approved by the Court.

    If you feel aggrieved by the number of emails LinkedIn sent on your behalf your first stop should be to read the settlement website along with the FAQs in order to determine whether or not you may actually be entitled to claim for compensation.

    If you are, then submit a claim, using the Claim ID found in the email you received and then enter the required information, taking note of the terms and conditions which make it clear that a false claim – i.e. you didn’t actually use Add Connections during the prescribed time period – would be classed as perjury.

    Though members have until 14 December to file a claim, the settlement still awaits approval by the court and LinkedIn may opt to appeal.

    Even so, the likelihood of the company paying out $13 million or more may just act as the prompt it needs to reassess its own email policy.

    Follow @Security_FAQs

    Follow @NakedSecurity

    Image of LinkedIn icon courtesy of rvlsoft / Shutterstock.com

    View the original article here

     
c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel
%d bloggers like this: