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  • jkabtech 12:17 pm on December 13, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: expands, Lockheed, Melbourne,   

    Lockheed expands AI research at Melbourne lab 

    Raydon Gates, CEO Lockheed Martin A/NZ and Dr. Keoki Jackson, Lockheed Martin’s CTO announce STELaRLab in 2016. (Credit: Lockheed Martin) Results could improve ‘Australia’s defence and national security’.

    Lockheed Martin is set to expand the number of researchers looking at machine learning and cognitive architectures at its nascent STELaRLab in Melbourne.

    STELaRLAB – which stands for science technology engineering leadership and research laboratory – was announced in August 2016 and launched a year later.

    It is a collaboration between Lockheed and the University of Melbourne. The defence contractor has put up an initial $13 million in seed funding.

    STELaRLAB is the first R&D centre that Lockheed Martin has opened outside of the United States.

    Its current research focuses include autonomous systems; robotics; command control communications, computer, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (C4ISR); artificial intelligence; and hypersonic vehicles.

    The projects it undertakes must have a “business interest to Lockheed Martin, which in turn are problems directly applicable to our national security needs”, the company said.

    A few short months after officially opening the lab, the contractor said it has now identified “an immediate need to expand our groups with skills in analytics, machine reasoning and AI applications and infrastructure development”.

    Machine reasoning is an evolution of machine learning that allows a system to not only learn from what it sees but to reason – much like a human would – when determining an appropriate course of action.

    Lockheed intends to bring onboard two new researchers to design and implement “cognitive architecture and supporting analytics and AI algorithms for multiple programs at Lockheed Martin for both internal and collaborative projects with academia and other government research institutions”.

    It said the results of the research “potentially have far reaching international impact for Australia’s defence and national security”, without elaborating.

    STELaRLAB is expected to house about 20 employees within its first three years.

    View the Original article

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  • jkabtech 4:17 am on September 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Melbourne, , , ,   

    Melbourne Uni turns to wi-fi to limit students to their own faculties 

    Micro DC panel discussion at Cloud & DC Edge 2017. Reveals ‘edge’ processing plans and projects.

    The University of Melbourne is considering a plan to dissuade students from congregating in libraries outside their areas of study by limiting their access to campus wi-fi in those places.

    It is understood that undisclosed faculties have raised concerns that their students are unable to access faculty library resources due to other students using the spaces.

    The university is hoping to tap its campus-wide wi-fi network – which has about 5000 access points – to identify the study areas of students entering or sat in faculty libraries “on-the-fly”.

    Students entering a faculty library not related to their area of study could find their wi-fi access limited as capacity is prioritised to students actually enrolled in that faculty’s studies.

    “Deans of some faculties are not happy that their libraries are being filled with all sorts of students who aren’t necessarily in their faculty, so their own students are missing out,” data centre and facility services manager Will Belcher told the Cloud & DC Edge Summit.

    “They want to try and use the data from the wireless access points and controllers – we track

    View the Original article

     
  • jkabtech 10:08 pm on July 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: congestion, Melbourne, sensors,   

    Melbourne CBD to track congestion with sensors 

    Huge IoT test project revealed.

    A 1.2 square kilometre area on the fringe of Melbourne CBD will be fitted with thousands of sensors for a massive smart transport project led by the University of Melbourne.

    The project will integrate sensor data with other “islands” of data from VicRoads, Public Transport Victoria, the City of Melbourne, City of Yarra, and with traffic updates from mapping firm Here.

    Sensors and wireless units will be fitted to the roads, as well as to traffic signals and vehicles.

    It is hoped the project will deliver “insights into traffic planning, pedestrian flows, public transport efficiency and freight movements”, the University said.

    The test area will act as a kind of “living transport lab”, taking in “busy freight and commuter routes and shopping strips including Australia’s most congested road, Hoddle Street.”

    It includes “7km of roadways and is bounded by Alexandra Pde to the north, Victoria Street to the south, Hoddle Street to the East and Lygon Street to the west.”

    The University will work with 17 public and private sector partners on the project, including tech firms NBN Co, Telstra, Ericsson, Siemens and Cubic.

    The test area is expected to begin operating in April this year.

    “We’re embracing advances in technology to ensure Victoria can create the highly-integrated, smart transport network our state can thrive on,” Victoria’s Minister for Roads and Roads Safety Luke Donnellan said in a statement.

    “We want to provide Victorians with the most efficient, safest transport system possible.”

    View the Original article

     
  • jkabtech 2:08 pm on July 13, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Melbourne, , , ,   

    Melbourne Uni turns to wi-fi to limit students to their own faculties 

    Micro DC panel discussion at Cloud & DC Edge 2017. Reveals ‘edge’ processing plans and projects.

    The University of Melbourne is considering a plan to dissuade students from congregating in libraries outside their areas of study by limiting their access to campus wi-fi in those places.

    It is understood that undisclosed faculties have raised concerns that their students are unable to access faculty library resources due to other students using the spaces.

    The university is hoping to tap its campus-wide wi-fi network – which has about 5000 access points – to identify the study areas of students entering or sat in faculty libraries “on-the-fly”.

    Students entering a faculty library not related to their area of study could find their wi-fi access limited as capacity is prioritised to students actually enrolled in that faculty’s studies.

    “Deans of some faculties are not happy that their libraries are being filled with all sorts of students who aren’t necessarily in their faculty, so their own students are missing out,” data centre and facility services manager Will Belcher told the Cloud & DC Edge Summit.

    “They want to try and use the data from the wireless access points and controllers – we track

    View the Original article

     
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